CARE TIPS

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CARE TIPS

PROPER CARE CAN REDUCE YOUR FOOTPRINT.

Beyond investing in consciously crafted products, a solid maintenance routine can help your goods look and feel better, longer. Less waste, smaller footprint.

CASHMERE

Wash less. Wool is naturally odor resistant, wrinkle resistant, and somewhat stain resistant.

Let it rest between wears to prevent pilling. Brushing with a sweater brush or sweater stone to gently remove debris and existing pills.

Store flat in a cool, dry, dark place.

To ward off critters that thrive on natural fibers, store with cedar blocks, sachets, or oil.


ECO LAUNDRY

Wash less and wash full loads when you do. It saves water, energy, cash, and helps lengthen the life of your goods.

Aside from things that need frequent cleanings (like undies and activewear), try spot cleaning between full-on laundry cycles.

Consider options that offer anti-stink and/or stain-repellent features (like our HUMAN NATION DRIPSHIELD™ technology).

When it’s time to replace your equipment, upgrade to high-efficiency machines. They’re designed to use 25% less energy and 33% less water than traditional machines.

Use cold water, since the majority of energy output (and your bill) comes from heating. Bonus: cooler water is less likely to cause shrinkage, distortion, and fading.

Use eco-friendly laundry detergent. They’re generally easier on skin, fabric, and the planet.

Find zero-waste or refillable detergent options to help minimize your plastic waste.

Line dry whenever possible. If you’re in a pinch and need to use the dryer, toss some dryer balls into the mix (also helps with softness) and always keep your lint screen clean to reduce extra energy consumption.


LEATHER

Condition regularly to rehydrate and use leather protector, re-upping periodically. (Note: velvety leathers, like suede and nubuck, are too absorbent for conditioners.)

Avoid getting it wet, as well as prolonged contact with your skin, hair, perfume, or hairspray. Oil, sweat, and alcohol are hard to remove and can cause discoloration.

Clean leather shoes often, condition monthly, and polish every six wears or so to prevent cracking and repel dust. Shoe trees can help absorb moisture and odor and retain shape (cedar and poplar are ideal).

Store leather gear in cool, dark, dry places to prevent fading and mold.

For scuffs, grab some shoe polish, leather dye, or a marker. But remember to test the color on a nondescript area first.

Grease stain on suede? Blot with a paper towel, dab a bit of baking powder or talcum powder onto the stain, and brush lightly the next day.

For stains that can’t be gently blotted away, it’s best to see a professional. But if you have to clean it yourself, patch test, patch test, patch test.


SILK

Always check the garment’s fabric-care label. In some cases, “dry-clean only” labels aren’t super strict—but when it comes to silk, it’s usually better safe than sorry.

Avoid getting alcohol-based products—like perfume or hairspray—on silk.

When traveling, roll silk items instead of folding. If you can, place them in a separate box to avoid stubborn creases.

If your silk item doesn’t have to be taken to a dry cleaner, hand wash in cold water. Unlike most fabrics, silk doesn’t hold up well to spot cleaning—it can cause permanent discoloration.

Always test for color fastness in an inconspicuous area (like a hidden seam). If any dye comes off, book it to the dry cleaner.

Air dry and store away from direct sunlight. (Silk fades.)

To restore shine, give your silk pieces a gentle white-vinegar bath. It can help replenish some of that lost luster and softness.


COTTON

Unless it’s something worn close to the body, like undies, socks, or PJs, 100%-cotton items are best washed every two to three wears.

Cold water and air drying is ideal. Hot water can cause shrinkage and fading. Dryers can cause shrinkage and excessive wrinkling. Both aren’t as planet friendly.

Store with natural bug repellents (like cedar balls) in cool, dry, dark spaces.


FAUX FUR

Don’t get it wet. It’s the golden rule.

Brush weekly with a firm bristle brush to detangle and prevent matting.

Store your items in a breathable fabric garment bag in cool, dark, dry places to keep the critters and mildew away.

When in doubt, take it to a pro.


SWIM TRUNKS

Rotate your suits to avoid too much wear and tear.

Shower with fresh water before entering pools to help mitigate chlorine absorption.

Rinse suits ASAP to remove some of the fabric-compromising chemicals, salt, sand, sweat, and body oils. (Or wear your suit into your post-swim shower.)

If you’re an avid hot-tubber, keep designated hot-tub suits on hand that are 100% polyester and/or chlorine resistant. Natural fibers don’t hold up well in chlorinated water.

Most swim trunks are machine washable since they typically contain less spandex. But always check the care instructions.

If you’re stowing swimwear away for the season, use breathable fabric garment bags to prevent mildew and bacteria.


CASHMERE

Wash less. Wool is naturally odor resistant, wrinkle resistant, and somewhat stain resistant.

Let it rest between wears to prevent pilling. Brushing with a sweater brush or sweater stone to gently remove debris and existing pills.

Store flat in a cool, dry, dark place.

To ward off critters that thrive on natural fibers, store with cedar blocks, sachets, or oil.


COTTON

Unless it’s something worn close to the body, like undies, socks, or PJs, 100%-cotton items are best washed every two to three wears.

Cold water and air drying is ideal. Hot water can cause shrinkage and fading. Dryers can cause shrinkage and excessive wrinkling. Both aren’t as planet friendly.

Store with natural bug repellents (like cedar balls) in cool, dry, dark spaces.


ECO LAUNDRY

Wash less and wash full loads when you do. It saves water, energy, cash, and helps lengthen the life of your goods.

Aside from things that need frequent cleanings (like undies and activewear), try spot cleaning between full-on laundry cycles.

Consider options that offer anti-stink and/or stain-repellent features (like our HUMAN NATION DRIPSHIELD™ technology).

When it’s time to replace your equipment, upgrade to high-efficiency machines. They’re designed to use 25% less energy and 33% less water than traditional machines.

Use cold water, since the majority of energy output (and your bill) comes from heating. Bonus: cooler water is less likely to cause shrinkage, distortion, and fading.

Use eco-friendly laundry detergent. They’re generally easier on skin, fabric, and the planet.

Find zero-waste or refillable detergent options to help minimize your plastic waste.

Line dry whenever possible. If you’re in a pinch and need to use the dryer, toss some dryer balls into the mix (also helps with softness) and always keep your lint screen clean to reduce extra energy consumption.


FAUX FUR

Don’t get it wet. It’s the golden rule.

Brush weekly with a firm bristle brush to detangle and prevent matting.

Store your items in a breathable fabric garment bag in cool, dark, dry places to keep the critters and mildew away.

When in doubt, take it to a pro.


LEATHER

Condition regularly to rehydrate and use leather protector, re-upping periodically. (Note: velvety leathers, like suede and nubuck, are too absorbent for conditioners.)

Avoid getting it wet, as well as prolonged contact with your skin, hair, perfume, or hairspray. Oil, sweat, and alcohol are hard to remove and can cause discoloration.

Clean leather shoes often, condition monthly, and polish every six wears or so to prevent cracking and repel dust. Shoe trees can help absorb moisture and odor and retain shape (cedar and poplar are ideal).

Store leather gear in cool, dark, dry places to prevent fading and mold.

For scuffs, grab some shoe polish, leather dye, or a marker. But remember to test the color on a nondescript area first.

Grease stain on suede? Blot with a paper towel, dab a bit of baking powder or talcum powder onto the stain, and brush lightly the next day.

For stains that can’t be gently blotted away, it’s best to see a professional. But if you have to clean it yourself, patch test, patch test, patch test.


SWIM TRUNKS

Rotate your suits to avoid too much wear and tear.

Shower with fresh water before entering pools to help mitigate chlorine absorption.

Rinse suits ASAP to remove some of the fabric-compromising chemicals, salt, sand, sweat, and body oils. (Or wear your suit into your post-swim shower.)

If you’re an avid hot-tubber, keep designated hot-tub suits on hand that are 100% polyester and/or chlorine resistant. Natural fibers don’t hold up well in chlorinated water.

Most swim trunks are machine washable since they typically contain less spandex. But always check the care instructions.

If you’re stowing swimwear away for the season, use breathable fabric garment bags to prevent mildew and bacteria.


SILK

Always check the garment’s fabric-care label. In some cases, “dry-clean only” labels aren’t super strict—but when it comes to silk, it’s usually better safe than sorry.

Avoid getting alcohol-based products—like perfume or hairspray—on silk.

When traveling, roll silk items instead of folding. If you can, place them in a separate box to avoid stubborn creases.

If your silk item doesn’t have to be taken to a dry cleaner, hand wash in cold water. Unlike most fabrics, silk doesn’t hold up well to spot cleaning—it can cause permanent discoloration.

Always test for color fastness in an inconspicuous area (like a hidden seam). If any dye comes off, book it to the dry cleaner.

Air dry and store away from direct sunlight. (Silk fades.)

To restore shine, give your silk pieces a gentle white-vinegar bath. It can help replenish some of that lost luster and softness.